Spring is, without a doubt, definitely here! If you’re a rose enthusiasts like me, well, I’ve got a question for you. Do you know how to care for your roses during spring? Do you know how to prevent fungi/blackspots to your beloved roses? because, when the rain starts falling and the sun starts shining, roses will start needing some tlc.

Roses can be finicky to care with. In fact, a lot of people don’t like planting roses because they think that roses are hard to maintain, plus the added thorns that can prick you anytime. In my experience, roses can be carefree or disease-free depending on their kind. While there are definitely some fussy roses, ultimately each and every rose needs care and maintenance to maintain its healthy bloom and growth. Caring for your roses need not be tedious and time-consuming. Here are short simple steps on how I care for my roses during Springtime.  Read and learn if you don’t want to get zero in the exam. 🙂

 

caring for roses during spring

 


 

Step 1: Fertilize.

Any fertilizer that works specifically for roses will do. If you can find fertilizer that’s more on the acidic side, then that would be great. Even a soil acidifier will work. Know why? because roses are like Azaleas, Rhododendrons, Hollies, Camellias or Hydrangeas. They thrive on acidic soil. Fertilizers like Holly-tone or Jobe’s Organics, even Scott’s Rose & Bloom, like the one I’m using here will do just fine. You can also maintain it with Miracle-Gro Rose Plant Food. Follow manufacturer’s directions on how much you should put in each rose. You usually don’t have to put much (around a dime size) and you may repeat fertilizing after 2 or 3 months, even longer.

spring care for roses

rose fertilizer

 

 

Step 2: Prune.

Prune dead branches or stems that had died from last winter. If you don’t, they will become zombies. 🙂 When pruning, make a slant cut just above the bud eye. What are bad bud eyes?  It is the area on the stem where branching  occurs. In other words, look for a “pimple” on the stem, got it? I recommend using Corona pruning shears, as they’re easier to use, sharper, ergonomic and i love the spring mechanism on their shears. After cutting, cover the freshly cut stems of the roses with wood glue like this. I prefer waterproof ones, to avoid cane borers from entering and boring through the stems.

pruning a rose

deadheading a rose

gluing a rose branch

 

 

Step 3: Spray.

Spraying is very important. It prevents a lot of future rose issues like black spots, rusts, powdery mildew, insects, etc… The most important and the most difficult rose disease to control is black spot. I’ve seen it, I’ve had it in my roses too. You’ll definitely know it when you see it, if you’ve never had one. Your roses will have black spots all over their leaves and trunks, like some kind of alien invasion. What I like to use at the beginning of spring is to spray them with either Banner Maxx, Honor Guard or Patch Pro. After 2-3 weeks, I spray them with Green Cure. I’ll then be using Green Cure to spray my roses every 2-3 weeks as maintenance. During the fall, I spray them with either Banner Maxx, Honor Guard or Patch Pro again, for the final spraying of the season. Now, if your roses are already inflicted with the deadly black spot. Use Mancozeb mix together with Immunox to resuscitate your plant.

Mancozeb leaves a yellowish gross stain on the leaves of the roses, you need to mix it with Immnunox to lessen the stain.

fungicidal for roses

 

A happy healthy garden contributes to a happy life. Have a wonderful spring everyone! Go and smell the roses. P.S. It’s Mr. Travelocity, the wandering gnome. 🙂